Accountability Cognitive Skills

Accountability in Cognitive Skills

Accountability in Cognitive Skills.  Why does being accountable for our emotions and behavior require so much effort? In society today the more we get away with reckless and unacceptable behavior the more we continue that behavior.

We trick our mind into accepting the lack of accountability as normal behavior. When our reckless behavior is addressed, we don’t like it. We get angry with everyone that has input in addressing that behavior. Rarely do we OWN our reckless behavior, rarely do we hold ourselves accountable, and although we know better, we rarely think our consequences are fair.

Accountability in Cognitive Skills may just change your life!

Consequences come in many forms. The most rejected consequence is when we are arrested and the negative consequences that follow.  Most often we are surprised when our behavior is addressed from a criminal aspect, thinking “I only had three beers, it was just one molly”, or I only fight when people won’t leave me alone”.  Reckless behavior, such as addiction, depression, anger, domestic violence, compulsive shoplifting, and theft, anxiety, not only affects the person engaging in that behavior, it also affects the community.  The community includes family, friends, neighbors, co-workers, and all other citizens within.

Accountability in Cognitive Skills may just change your life!

When we are engaged in negative behavior as a community it has to be addressed and when we accept ownership of our behavior it is at that point we are open to accountability. Once we accept accountability for our reckless behavior we understand the consequences we know to expect are inevitable. We are able to embrace the corrective behavior skills presented and if practiced we have the ability to make better decisions in our life. We learn to adapt from the learned behavior and our environmental influences, we learn to and conform to positive thinking and not respond to negative thinking or negative emotions as we understand that would contribute to a cycle of chaos in our lives and no accountability.

 

Sabrina Davis, CIT

AACS ATLANTA – May 28, 2018

Relapse in the Warmer Season

Relapse in the warmer season?

Relapse in the warmer season
Relapse Prevention

Warm weather is here and life starts feeling easier, right? Well, not always, if you’re in recovery. Recovering people face serious challenges while staying sober during the spring and summer seasons and official holidays. Relapse in the warmer season is avoidable. Spring and summer come with sports games, picnics, barbecues, weddings and celebrations all seem to involve alcohol of some sort. Some of us may run into your old marijuana or drug-loving friends at the beach, pool, or a friend’s party. How do we stay clean and sober over the season when temptation present at all corners?

The warmer season is all about being casual and having fun in the sun. Most of us have a carefree attitude with lower inhibitions. However, we have learned not to be carefree about recovery. No matter where summer fun leads, sobriety and recovery should remain our number-one priority every day — We can still have plenty of sober fun under the sun and catch some rays or waves.

AACS offers tips for staying sober during the spring and summer holidays. We have listed tips to help us navigate both daily lives as well as those special occasions like graduation parties, weddings, and 4th of July parties that all seem to coincide with summer fun.

Here are ten simple suggestion that can help you stay clean and sober during the warmer season. We will be grateful by the end of the season for maintaining our recovery.

  1. Put recovery first
  2. Attend 12-step or self-help meetings
  3. Plan ahead with friend in sobriety
  4. Use the buddy system
  5. Be honest with yourself and others
  6. Plan sober fun
  7. Don’t focus on what you can’t have
  8. Avoid resentment at all times
  9. Volunteer
  10. Call your sponsor daily

Save

TIPS for Surviving the Holidays; Stay Sober During the Holidays

TIPS for Surviving the Holidays

Tips for Surviving the Holidays
Affordable Sober Living in Atlanta

Do you want to stay sober during the holidays? The holidays can be a joyful or painful time of the year. Tis the season for greetings, family, cheer and beer but for addicts it can be a time of triggers, running emotions, stress and disappointments. What does one in recovery do when the holidays come and family is too far away to see and you start to feel a little lonely or when that one cousin is insisting that just one drink won’t hurt? Here are 10 helpful tips on how survive the holidays without substances.

Tips for Surviving the Holiday

Prepare or amend your relapse prevention (RP) plan.

The purpose of a relapse prevention plan is to proactively set boundaries and guidelines in order to keep your sobriety. Relapse is not a onetime, overnight event, it is a process that can begin days, weeks or months before you use again. A well prepared RP plan can help you better prepare and navigate through the various stages of relapse (emotional, mental and physical). Check back later for more details on the various stages of relapse. Check out the links below for more information on relapse prevention. http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh23-2/151-160.pdf or

http://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/SMA-3720/SMA-3720.pdf

  1. Keep calm and work the steps.

Attend 12 Step meetings before and after any big events and continue to go to the meetings during the holiday season. The importance of meetings cannot be stressed enough. This is where you can develop support systems, remain strong in your commitment to recovery and gain a sense of stability, comfort, and confidence.

Save